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Heather brooke

Professor Heather Brooke is an award-winning investigative journalist originally from the US now based in London. Her investigative journalism and legal action against the British Parliament for disclosure of MPs' expenses was the catalyst of the expenses scandal of that led to the biggest clear-out of politicians in decades and the first forced resignation of the Speaker of the House in years. She went on to investigate hackers and Wikileaks, reporting for The Guardian. In she also taught an investigative journalism course at Columbia University in New York City. Investigative journalists have much in common, not least an obsessive attention to detail and a compulsion to keep digging when most normal people would move on. But are these inherent character trait A major new UN study of countries' legal source protection frameworks has found that they are out of date and need strengthening in many cases. And how can journalists harness the power of social media Press releases may increasingly fill re Diving into Data: The School of Data Journalism at the International Journalism Festival in Perugia In the past investigative reporters would suffer from a scarcity of information relating to quest
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Heather Rose Brooke born is a British-American journalist and freedom of information campaigner. Resident since the s in the UK, she helped to expose the expenses scandal , which culminated in the resignation of House of Commons Speaker Michael Martin and several MPs standing down in general election [1]. According to The Scotsman , she briefly moved to England as a teenager, but returned to the United States when she was While there, she wrote for the student newspaper, The Daily , covering news stories and acting as the paper's sex columnist , writing with what she called a "feminist" slant. An internship with The Spokesman-Review in Olympia, Washington to cover the state legislature gave her an early exposure to using public records requests to investigate the expenses of politicians, although she found little beyond taking advantage of frequent flyer miles. After graduation, she worked for a year at the Spokesman-Review , but it lacked the funds to keep her on longer. Describing herself as "burnt out" from covering over murders, Brooke took a break from journalism. Boyd Tonkin wrote in that when she arrived in the UK she was immediately introduced to the "British disease": "the overweening haughtinesss of bureaucratic jobsworths, and the deference of citizens. With the enactment of the Freedom of Information Act , Brooke began work on a book explaining how to use the law, which was not scheduled to come into effect for another five years. In October it was revised and published in paperback and hardcover editions that included a foreword by satirist Ian Hislop.
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She is the author of The Revolution Will be Digitised. She is professor of journalism at City University and a visiting lecturer in contemporary history at University East Anglia. She is a former member of the Royal United Services Institute independent surveillance review panel. She tweets newsbrooke. In the last of our series of book festival moments Heather Brooke , investigative journalist and author of The Revolution Will Be Digitised, tells us why she is in love with this year's theme of revolution. Heather Brooke: Prince Andrew needn't worry: the royal family is protected from public accountability by law. Published: 15 Sep The new surveillance bill renders the citizen transparent to the state, putting every one of us under suspicion. It would serve a tyranny well. Published: 8 Nov

Professor Heather Brooke is an award-winning investigative journalist originally from the US now based in London. Her investigative journalism and legal action against the British Parliament for disclosure of MPs' expenses was the catalyst of the expenses scandal of that led to the biggest clear-out of politicians in decades and the first forced resignation of the Speaker of the House in years.

She went on to investigate hackers and Wikileaks, reporting for The Guardian. In she also taught an investigative journalism course at Columbia University in New York City.

Investigative journalists have much in common, not least an obsessive attention to detail and a compulsion to keep digging when most normal people would move on. But are these inherent character trait A major new UN study of countries' legal source protection frameworks has found that they are out of date and need strengthening in many cases.

And how can journalists harness the power of social media Press releases may increasingly fill re Diving into Data: The School of Data Journalism at the International Journalism Festival in Perugia In the past investigative reporters would suffer from a scarcity of information relating to quest The new civic journalism How can new technologies be used to provide public interest journalism? Is WikiLeaks and social media the way to hold power to account through the internet? Heather Brooke, t Facebook Twitter Email WhatsApp.

Heather Brooke. Events in past editions. James Ball. Proxies, lawyers and dummy companies Heather Brooke. Photos ijf



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